For the third day, 100,000 Palestinians in Shufat refugee camp and Anata town remain under Israeli lockdown

A closed Shufat refugee camp checkpoint (WAFA Images)

WAFA  /  October 10, 2022

JERUSALEM – The Israeli army today, and for the third day, kept all exits from Shufat refugee camp and nearby Anata town, northeast of Jerusalem, where at least 100,000 Palestinians live, under forced lockdown after shutting down all checkpoints, according to local sources.

At the same time, the Israeli occupation forces continued to raid homes in the two communities, clash with residents and detain people as hundreds of soldiers, security agents, police, and members of the intelligence continue to search for a Palestinian they claim has carried out a fatal attack on Saturday night at the Shufat refugee camp army checkpoint, killing a woman soldier and critically injuring a security man.

The army has prevented all residents, including students, from leaving the camp, which is separated from East Jerusalem by an eight-meter-high concrete wall and a military checkpoint despite the fact that it is located within the Jerusalem municipal boundaries.

Hundreds were also left stranded inside and outside the camp and town as the army prevented them from leaving or entering these areas after locking it down following the shooting attack prompting Palestinians to offer them food and shelter while they wait for the army to reopen the checkpoints once again.

Reports from the refugee camp said at least 20 people were arrested since the attack, including, according to army claims, members of the family of the alleged attacker.

A local source said today that Israeli police attacked a father and his son, hitting the father with a stun grenade in the stomach as he tried to confront the Israeli forces while trying to apprehend his 24-year-old son. The man was taken to the hospital for treatment and the son was detained.

Anata mayor Taha Rifai told WAFA that the Israeli forces continued today to break into homes, terrorizing families, stopping people in the streets and checking their papers, while forcing shops to shut down.

Several stores have also reported a shortage in supplies due to the closure of the checkpoints at these two communities.